Sécurité des cabinets dentaires

Vous êtes-vous déja demandé quelles sont les mesures de sécurité que votre dentiste doit prendre?

Un grand nombre de patients fréquentent les cabinets dentaires. Votre dentiste et son équipe appliquent des mesures rigoureuses de sécurité et de prévention des infections pour assurer à tous un environnement sécuritaire.

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Ces précautions sont universelles.  Elles constituent l’ensemble des procédures devant être suivies par tous les intervenants, pour tous les patients. Leur application permet de diminuer les risques de contagion, de contamination et d’infection d’une personne à une autre. Ca permet donc d’augmenter la sécurité des patients. Les risques de transmission des infections dans les cabinets dentaires sont ainsi très faibles. Les cas de contagion sont très rares.

Voici les mesures de précaution universelles. Elles protègent également les patients, le dentiste et les membres de son équipe.

Les barrières physiques pour la sécurité

Les gants servent de barrière entre la salive, le sang, les muqueuses du patient et les mains du dentiste, de l’hygiéniste et de l’assistant. Ils sont jetés après le traitement de chaque patient ou chaque fois que le dentiste ou un autre membre de l’équipe soignante sort de la salle de travail.

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Le masque protège le dentiste, l’hygiéniste et l’assistant contre les microbes contenus dans les fines gouttelettes d’eau en suspension dans l’air lorsqu’ils travaillent dans la bouche du patient. Le masque protège aussi le patient de toute infection transmissible par les voies aériennes, telle la grippe.

Les lunettes protègent les yeux de l’intervenant et du patient contre d’éventuelles égratignures, blessures ou éclaboussures contaminées.  Elles évitent les infections de l’œil.

La blouse et les vêtements de travail préviennent la contamination des vêtements des membres de l’équipe dentaire. Elle évite aussi le transport de microbes à l’extérieur du lieu de travail.

Les bonnes pratiques pour la sécurité

Le dentiste et son personnel lavent les mains s’effectue avec du savon avant et après le port des gants, entre chaque patient et lorsque le dentiste change de salle de travail.

La stérilisation est un procédé qui détruit les micro-organismes. Tous les instruments qui entrent en contact avec la bouche des patients sont stérilisés avant chaque utilisation. Demandez-en plus à votre dentiste. Il pourra vous expliquer comment il s’assure que les instruments soient bien stériles.

Le personnel désinfecte les surfaces de travail entre chaque patient. La désinfection permet de détruire les micro-organismes qui peuvent transmettre les maladies.

L’utilisation de matériel jetable est nécessaire. Certains instruments et certaines pièces d’équipement ne peuvent être ni stérilisés, ni lavés, ni réutilisés, par exemple les gants, les masques, les aiguilles, les compresses, les rouleaux de coton, etc.

Pour plus d’informations visitez notre site web :)

source: http://odq.qc.ca

 

A dental hygienist in my bathroom?

Philips Sonicare is launching a new smart toothbrush that connects to an app via Bluetooth. I know, the first thing you’ll say is: why do I need a toothbrush that has Bluetooth? And that’s a valid question. You probably don’t, but you might if you really care about oral hygiene and don’t mind spending more time than most people brushing your teeth in the morning and night.

The new toothbrush, which goes by the unnecessarily long name Philips Sonicare FlexCare Platinum Connected, combines a variety of sensors in the handle to track in real time how you’re brushing your teeth. The data is synced via Bluetooth to an app for both iOS and Android. The way it works is pretty straightforward: as you brush, a 3D map of your mouth shows you which teeth you’re brushing and tells you if you’re brushing too much or too little. The app also warns you if you’re using too much pressure or scrubbing too hard. When the two minutes of brushing are up (both the brush and the app have a timer), you can see if you missed any spots.

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The app also gives you progress reports, allows you to set goals, tells you when to replace the brush head, and sends you those annoying motivational messages typical of any health apps (“Keep it up!”). But probably the most useful feature is that the app allows you to set focus areas on particular teeth that might need more work, as recommended by your dentist. If you have a crown on a root canal, for example, and your dentist tells you to brush that area more carefully, you can include that kind of personalized coaching into the app. You can also send the data on your brushing performance to your dentist. The FlexCare Platinum Connected is basically your worst nightmare: it brings your dentist into your bathroom.

I could see a lot of things go wrong with this toothbrush, starting with the fact that my tiny New York City bathroom has literally no space where I can rest my iPhone while I brush my teeth, without water or toothpaste spits getting to it. And do I really want to stare at my phone even when I’m brushing my teeth? The toothbrush also seems to make toothbrushing an even more time-consuming experience than anyone, except your hygienist, wants it to be. I think I would grow tired of checking my brushing performance on the app and eventually just use the FlexCare Platinum Connected as a regular electronic toothbrush.

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That said, the FlexCare Platinum Connected will cost $199.99, which is pretty much what you  pay for a Philips Sonicare DiamondClean. So for the same price, you can have Bluetooth and get feedback on how well you’re brushing your teeth. And even get flossing and tongue scraping reminders. Of course, for $100 less, you can also get an Oral-B Pro 5000, which also has Bluetooth connection and doesn’t seem that much different from the new Philips Sonicare to me. The apps look incredibly similar, actually.

The connected toothbrush is launching in July. The battery lasts up to two weeks between charges. And the toothbrush memorizes up to 14 brushing sessions, so that if you don’t sync it for about two weeks, the data won’t be lost.

Doctor, baby teeth are useless because they will fall out!

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Misconception: Baby teeth don’t matter because they are going to fall out anyway.
Actually: Neglecting baby teeth can set a child up for lifelong dental trouble.

Nearly a quarter of all children between the ages of 2 and 5 have cavities, a study at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found.

What’s the big deal? some parents ask. Those teeth are going to fall out anyway.

It may be tempting to skip brushing if a toddler puts up a fuss, or allow a picky eater to snack nonstop on their favorite carbohydrates — a recipe for cavities. But once the damage is done, it’s not as easy as pulling them out and waiting for the permanent lineup.

Preschoolers who have cavities in their baby teeth are three times as likely as other preschool children to develop cavities in their permanent teeth, according to an often-quoted study published in the Journal of Dental Research in 2002.

A 5-year-old’s oral health can even predict greater decay and disease at 26, especially for poor children, another study found.

This may be caused partly by not flossing and brushing with flouride twice daily but also by sipping sugary drinks over long periods.

 

And did you know that cavities or caries are an infectious disease cause by bacteria?

So even if one decayed, brown-mottled tooth falls out, an infection may continue ravaging that child’s mouth.
Another reason for restoring a decayed baby tooth is that, left untreated, it can become abscessed, at which point it lead to an emergency situation. At least 67 people in the United States died after being hospitalized with oral infections between 2000 to 2008.

However, just pulling a decayed tooth can cause problems, because primary teeth are place holders for adult ones. In the absence of a place holder, adjacent teeth may drift into the space, blocking the growth of the permanent tooth. This recipe basically guarantees misaligned teeth later on. Braces anyone?

Beyond brushing twice a day with fluoride toothpaste and floss once a day, one way to reduce the risk of cavities may be to limit snacks and juice boxes to a 15-minute period so a child’s teeth are not constantly taking an acidic bath. Another is to make sure an adult does the brushing until a child has the dexterity to do it well, which some dentists say is roughly when they can tie their own shoes.

Source: NYtimes.com

Beach vacation and bright smile: what is dental tourism?

In a nutshell, dental tourism involves traveling to another country for more affordable dental treatments, and surgery. 

This is a common practice among many Americans, Canadians and Europeans who are looking for ways to save money on dental treatments that are normally expensive in their respective countries.

09a4b1c8ae860bb457325d2e9c48ac05“While the exact statistics on dental tourism aren’t available, it is estimated that over one million people from around the world travel to get dental treatment such as cosmetic dentistry, dental implants, crowns, and root canals abroad. There are a number of countries such as India, Thailand, Costa Rica, Hungary, Panama, South Africa, and Mexico that are marketing low cost, high quality dental services to medical tourists,” revealed Placid Way, a health and wellness tourism company.

The same is true in Canada where an estimated 10,000 Canadians travel abroad each year to shop for more affordable dental treatment. Bargain deals, and exotic travel opportunities can make dental tourism a tempting offer indeed.

But behind this silver lining is a dark cloud.

As the popularity of dental tourism increases, the Ordre des Dentistes du Quebec said it has received a significant number of calls from people who have had bad experiences abroad.

Take the case of Elise Paquette*, a 38-year-old mother of five who traveled all the way to Costa Rica to have her teeth fixed. She decided to share her story to help others make better decisions than she has.

Paquette, who lost her two front teeth in an accident 20 years ago, was always conscious about her smile and didn’t feel confident with dentures. She was so embarrassed about her teeth that it was four months after she met her husband Sébastien Tremblay* before she admitted she wore dentures.

“I used to wait until he was asleep before I removed them,” she admitted.

Tremblay, 34, understood the agony that Paquette felt and surprised her one day by offering to pay for her bridge work as an early birthday present. Paquette was thrilled. Little did she know her nightmare was about to begin.

“I looked into having the work done by a Quebec dentist, but quotes ranged from 6,000$ to 30,000$. I then read an article in a women’s magazine about dental treatment in Costa Rica and decided to investigate. It was a decision I now regret,” Paquette said.

It all happened so fast. She contacted the clinic in Costa Rica and in a few weeks they arranged her flight, accommodations, first visit with the dentist, and complementary sightseeing for a few days.

So far, it was looking like a wonderful vacation.

Once at the clinic, she voiced her desires to the Costa Rica dentist: she wanted to replace her missing teeth with implants, and rebuild the rest of her existing teeth with crowns. So the doctor produced her a quote for 3,000$ and promised her amazing results, she was going to look like a Hollywood star.  What a bargain!beautiful-woman-smiling-e1432594340454

“After discussing it with my husband, we both agreed this was the best option for me. We’re not rich, you know. And getting rid of that denture was my biggest dream! So to save a plane ticket, I decided to go ahead and start right away” Paquette said.

What ensued, was a series of misfortunes and medical failures.

An hours later her 2 implants were in place. The dentist warned her that he covered the teeth with a temporary denture. She would have to travel back in 6 months to complete the work. “No problem.”said Tremblay “We had been warned about this, and we were financially ready to come back.”

Back to Quebec, is where the trouble started.

“First of all, half my lip was still numb, the freezing never went away. I was so scared. Every time I was eating I was biting my lip because i couldn’t feel it. It swelled up and got infected. And the temporary denture was moving when i was eating and talking. The rubbing caused ulcers all over my mouth. I ended up removing it to eat. I was so ashamed I couldn’t eat in public.” Paquette said.

Due to the numb feeling in her lip, she consulted a Quebec dentist.

After taking some X-rays, he discovered some nerve trauma caused by the implants.

Risk He advised to remove them, but since the implants were not approved in Canada, he was not able to do it. After consulting a few other Canadian dentists, finally a maxillofacial surgeon removed her implants. “Another 2000$ later… at least my wife regained her feeling in her lip” said Tremblay.

Elise Paquette returned 6 months later to Costa Rica to finish the work. Instead of getting her final teeth in, the doctor put her implants back. “He put that horrible temporary denture back in her mouth” said Tremblay.

Due to healing complications, she got her final teeth after 2 more visits. And 2 more plane tickets.

“In the end, if you count the 4 visits to Costa Rica, my emergency procedures in Canada caused by treatment mistakes, the time I had to miss work, it cost me over 25,000$. Was it worth it? I deeply regret it. Besides, my teeth are much too white to look natural.” said Paquette. “I am now thinking of changing them with my dentist in Quebec.”

Elise Paquette endured financial and physical hardship. She hoped to save money. Instead she spent more and suffered through 2 years of tropical medicine nightmare.

“Do your research people. If it’s too good to be true, it probably is.” said Paquette.

*Although this is a true story, the names have been changed to protect identities of those involved.

Docteur, j’ai une phobie du dentiste!

woman-with-toothacheChristiane, une jeune femme de 43 ans, se prépare pour sa sortie de filles semi-annuelle. Tous les 6 mois, avec ses copines les plus proches, elles se paient un bon resto à Montréal. Pendant qu’elle se maquille, une douleur atroce la prend par surprise. Ça provient de sa dent cassée en bas à gauche. Bizarre… pourtant cette dent ne lui a jamais fait mal, elle s’est juste cassée un beau jour il y a 3 ans. La douleur monte jusque dans l’oreille gauche. Il lui semble que c’est encore plus douloureux qu’un accouchement!

Elle se souvient qu’elle n’a pas été chez le dentiste depuis son adolescence. Le bruit des instruments lui fait très peur. Elle n’est pas retournée depuis.

Christiane n’est pas seule. Environ 40% de la population a peur du dentiste, et environ 2-6% de la population souffre d’une vraie phobie. Ce pourcentage est entrain de diminuer grâce à plusieurs techniques que les dentistes emploient pour aider leurs patients anxieux.

Sédation consciente

IMG_1277Il existe 2 types de sédation consciente: avec le Protoxyde d’azote, ou à l’aide d’un sédatif oral. La premiere option est administrée à l’aide d’un masque nasal, ou “nez de clown”. La deuxième option est une pilule à prendre 1 heure avant votre traitement.

Voici quelques témoignages de patients qui ont choisi le sédatif oral:

“J’ai rien senti durant le traitement, même que je ne me souviens pas que le traitement a pris 2 heures. Dans ma tête c’était 10 minutes!” Louis M.

“C’était comme si j’ai pris une coupe de verres avant le rendez-vous. Ce fut bien agréable :) ” Geneviève L.

 

Technique d’auto hypnose

Cette technique peut être adaptée aux soins dentaires qui sont souvent source de stress et d’angoisse. Il peut être avantageux et très utile d’utiliser l’hypnose dans la dentisterie, car elle répond aux besoins des professionnels comme aux demandes des patients.

Thérapie psychologique

D’après l’Association des Psychologues du Québec, plusieurs traitements en psychothérapie ont fait leurs preuves dans le traitement de la phobie.  Il n’existe aucune raison valable de s’empêcher de consulter.

Plusieurs psychologues utilisent la thérapie d’approche cognitive- comportementale, par exemple, laquelle a une efficacité démontrée pour diminuer l’anxiété de façon significative et, souvent, enrayer la phobie.  Il s’agit d’une approche relativement simple et rapide qui cible directement la réaction anxieuse et apporte des améliorations en peu de temps.  La satisfaction est élevée.  Plusieurs personnes qui ont consulté pour une phobie n’ont qu’un regret: ne pas l’avoir fait avant!

Anesthésie Générale

Si toutes les avenues ont été explorée face à votre phobie, il existe toujours l’option de faire vos traitements sous anesthésie générale. Cette technique se pratique dans un hôpital, ou bien dans une clinique d’anesthésie générale.

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Quoi qu’il en soit, chez DentisteALaval.com vous serez bien entourés pour vous aider de combattre votre phobie. Venez nous voir, nous allons vous faire sourire :)

Doctor, it’s Chloe’s first time!

 

 Is it your child’s first visit at the dentist?

Make sure you prepare your child. One important thing is to talk about your dentist with nice words only. Describe the experience as a fun one. Always present the experience as positive :)

If you are particularly scared of the dentist it is important to not let that fear show through. Sometimes it is even better to address your own fears first. As psychologist Dr Bruce Peltier, PhD described the therapy with one of his patients “Over the course of almost a dozen sessions, the patient and I worked together to teach him self-hypnosis to relax and then used systematic desensitization to help him overcome his dental phobia.”

“The patient was proud, and the dentist felt good about it,” says Peltier, an associate professor of psychology at the University of the Pacific School of Dentistry in San Francisco. “There’s a lot psychologists can do for dentists, their staff and their patients.”

Do a little research and explain to her how it will go.

Start by showing your child photos of the clinic and of the staff. Good tools are our website, google and youtube.

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You can also show your child an educational video that will help to show her what will actually happen during her appointment at the clinic. This video above is particularly good, because it describes the actual experience.

Make sure you book the appointment early in the morning, as children are in better shape at that time. We often see patients in the evening, and since it is closer to their bedtime, they tend to be a little more grumpy and overall more tired of their day. We are also open Saturdays!

Before the appointment feed your child his normal meal. Avoid foods that are too heavy or greasy, and try to stay away from too much junk food.

All these recommendations will put your child in a better position to have fun at his appointment. Every fun dentist appointment will help motivate your little munchkin to brush, floss and take care of his teeth, which in return will help preserve his overall health for a very long time.

Voilà. Happy dentist appointment! :)

 

 

Transforming Dentistry: Australian Researcher Uses BioPrinting to Engineer New Jaw & Gum Cells

What about toothaches, anxiety-producing procedures, and terrifying bills that immediately erase all hope of that Bahamian vacation? Are those becoming obsolete? Some pretty amazing things are going on in the dental industry, however, thanks to the new technology—and when it comes to that next complex procedure—you may find help from your own cells and 3D printing technology, thanks to new discoveries coming out of Australia.

By now, you’ve probably heard of bioprinting. While it may seem that most researchers are heavily embroiled in making everything from kidney tissue to blood vessels with the end result being the ability to 3D print organs and keep them viable, a new procedure in dentistry takes a different tact.

According to Periodontist Professor Saso Ivanovski, from Griffith University’s Menzies Institute, after five years of research, he has developed a way to engineer missing bone and tissue in the gums and jaw by using a patient’s own cells. Many may not realize this unless they’ve had similar procedures, but currently dental surgeons take bone and tissue from parts of the body like the hip and even the skull, says Ivanoski.

“These procedures are often associated with significant pain, nerve damage and postoperative swelling,” he said.

Ivanovski’s method should in concept offer improvement all around, including better affordability. And if his study meets with success, the idea would work as such: patients could have a CT scan taken of the region that is damaged. It would then be sent to a bioprinter, where a new part would be made. 7288594-3x2-940x627

“The cells, the extracellular matrix and other components that make up the bone and gum tissue are all included in the construct and can be manufactured to exactly fit the missing bone and gum for a particular individual,” Professor Ivanovski said.

As with many other bioprinting concepts and 3D printed implants, the new cells would be expected to grow successfully into the existing healthy tissue, with the use of personal cells making this much more likely to work.
“At the end of the whole process, you wouldn’t be able to identify what is old bone and new,” Professor Ivanovski said.
While this obviously follows the basics of bioprinting happening in many other labs as well, it offers an immediate solution to an immediate need. Due to its potential in the dental industry, this is to be a three-year study and has been granted $650,000 from the National Health and Medical Research Council.

Researchers hope to begin pre-clinical trials for the bioprinting dental procedures during the next year.
“By the end of the year we want to start implanting some of the constructs in some of the more straightforward processes,” Professor Ivanovski said.

original article from 3dprint.com